"Decadence Dance: by Extreme

6:48 for 7/18

1 - Ignore the time on this. I’m pretty sure it’s a single edit and/or there was, if I remember correctly, some kind of intro. (Give me a break people, it’s been awhile and I’m not at my stash).

2 - Nuno Bettencourt. 

3 - Question of the Day - How could Gary Cherone be so good in Extreme and so bad in Van Halen? I mean, everyone knows he’s no DLR, but not only wasn’t even Sammy Hagar, he wasn’t even Michael Anthony on background vocals. Anyway, like Bogey said, we’ll always have Extreme. Or something like that. 

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Originally Posted By the-theme-is
Plays: 10

the-theme-is:

Artist: Extreme

Song: Kid Ego

Album: Extreme

Year: 1989

Theme: 80s Hair Bands

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Originally Posted By awordoraline
Plays: 2749

awordoraline:

Extreme - Hole Hearted

Sometimes it feels like a song is following me around. I have heard this song too many times in random places lately not to post it.

The harmony. Oh, the harmony.

Rivers flow into the sea
Yet even the sea is not so full of me
If I’m not blind why can’t I see
That a circle can’t fit and where a square should be

Acoustic guitars…to the Extreme!

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For Elena - maybe this will help get rid of your blahs :)

(Source: Spotify)

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Last week’s music posts:

Blister in the Sunday: "Watching the Wheels" by John Lennon

Metal Monday: "Get the Funk Out" by Extreme

Blues and Jazz Tuesday: "Paris, Texas" by Ry Cooder

Wednesday’s Women: "Running Up That Hill" by Kate Bush

Re-worked Thursday: "Honky Tonk Women" by The Pogues

Feelin’-it Friday: "Three Penny Operator" by Ron Hawkins

Saturday Shred: "Dead Leaves and the Dirty Ground" by The White Stripes

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"Get the Funk Out" by Extreme

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Plays: 10

"Get the Funk Out" by Extreme

(Words/Music: Gary Cherone and Nuno Buttencourt, Album: Pornograffiti, A&M Records 1990)

By 1990, the mainstream metal world was basically split into two camps: party metal and serious metal. Party metal included such bands as Poison, Def Leppard, and Warrant and, with the exception of power ballads, generally featured anthemic lyrics designed to inspire fist pumping and head banging. Serious metal bands like Queensryche and Metallica provided topical lyrics of social and political issues and rarely, if ever, lowered themselves to the more “pop” party metal. Occasionally though, the two did merge. While Poison had “Something To Believe In” and Warrant had “Uncle Tom’s Cabin,” both songs reeked of being contrived to gather a wider, more serious audience and were generally cringe-worthy. And just because they learned to strum a few chords on an acoustic guitar, I’m pretty sure I don’t want Bret Michaels and Jani Lane trying to teach important life lessons. 

However, one band did manage to combine original and poignant lyrics with fun, upbeat music. Although they will be eternally and ironically known for two acoustic songs, “More Than Words” and “Hole-Hearted,” Extreme managed to garner praise from the critics for their social commentary, their ability to incorporate other musical genres with metal, and the seriously fluid and energetic fretwork of Nuno Bettencourt. “Get the Funk Out,” a favorite song at live shows (for hopefully obvious reasons), was the final single from the Pornograffitti album and, I believe, was the band’s attempt to regain their metal cred after the two aforementioned acoustic singles pegged them as a ballad band. In addition to some unique and catchy lyrics, the song features a funky bass rhythm and a complete horn section, both of which were completely missing from metal songs at that point. It is this willingness to step away from the scripted recipe of 90s metal that made Extreme one of the exciting up-and-coming bands at the time in my collection. Unfortunately, the heyday of fun and upbeat metal would soon come to an end, squashed by the overly-serious trudging invader from the northwest: grunge. Singer Gary Cherone would eventually make the embarrassingly big mistake of singing with Van Halen and guitarist Nuno Bettencourt would find himself playing guest artist on a variety of other artists’ records from Janet Jackson to Perry Farrell. But for a few moments in the early 90s, many of the best elements of metal converged in Extreme. 

More Extreme: AmazonMP3 - last.fm - AllMusic - eMusic

More Metal Monday posts from shelterfromthenorm

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