Waiting for Henry V in Delaware Park.

Waiting for Henry V in Delaware Park.

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Originally Posted By dailydoseofdylan
Plays: 90

dailydoseofdylan:

"Desolation Row" by Bob Dylan

Now Ophelia, she’s ‘neath the window
For her I feel so afraid
On her twenty-second birthday
She already is an old maid
To her, death is quite romantic
She wears an iron vest
Her profession’s her religion
Her sin is her lifelessness
And though her eyes are fixed upon
Noah’s great rainbow
She spends her time peeking
Into Desolation Row.

My students just finished Act 4 of Hamlet, and today we discussed Shakespeare’s thoughts on madness. Up to this point, they had been tracking Hamlet’s supposed madness, but Ophelia’s appearance and death challenged many of their perspectives. It seemed as though her actions made Hamlet’s supposed madness seem rather tame and staged by comparison, but then they started wondering whether madness manifested itself in outrageous behavior like Ophelia’s. Since the overarching question was about Shakespeare’s thoughts on madness, they concluded that it needed to be outrageous on stage, but not necessarily in real life. I thought this was a fairly sophisticated conclusion to come to.

They’re still struggling with Hamlet’s visions of his father, though. Especially the fact that the guards see the ghost in the beginning, but Hamlet’s mother doesn’t see him later in the play while Hamlet does. Alas, if literature was a pretty little package, it wouldn’t be nearly as enjoyable as it is when it’s a “loose, baggy monster” (Henry James). 

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Originally Posted By theatlantic

theatlantic:

How Shakespeare Would End Breaking Bad

Three episodes remain of Breaking Bad, the riveting series on AMC that tracks the descent of Walter White, a high school chemistry teacher turned drug kingpin. The show has accurately been compared to a Shakespearean tragedy, and it’s clear that the Bard’s works have influenced Vince Gilligan, the show’s creator. Perhaps, then, one might turn to the works of Shakespeare to try and divine how Breaking Bad might end—or at least, how Shakespeare would end it.
(If you’re not caught up on the show, this is a good place to stop reading.)
Read more. [Image: AMC]

theatlantic:

How Shakespeare Would End Breaking Bad

Three episodes remain of Breaking Bad, the riveting series on AMC that tracks the descent of Walter White, a high school chemistry teacher turned drug kingpin. The show has accurately been compared to a Shakespearean tragedy, and it’s clear that the Bard’s works have influenced Vince Gilligan, the show’s creator. Perhaps, then, one might turn to the works of Shakespeare to try and divine how Breaking Bad might end—or at least, how Shakespeare would end it.

(If you’re not caught up on the show, this is a good place to stop reading.)

Read more. [Image: AMC]

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First week teaching Brit Lit

  1. I haven’t mentioned Iron Maiden yet - so if you had the first two days, you lose.
  2. However, I did mention Ozzy and Oasis because we were talking about indecipherable accents.
  3. I spent a full five minutes talking about tea rituals in Victorian England. 
  4. I told the Churchill anecdote which ends with him saying “But in the morning, I’ll be sober.” You know the one.
  5. I referred to Lord of the Flies as “a bunch of nice prep school boys who set up a resort on a tropical island.”
  6. I also mentioned that all of British Literature has culminated in Harry Potter. Just follow the castles and wizards.
  7. We discussed John of Gaunt’s “scepter’d isle” speech from Richard II which led to a discussion of the crown jewels and I managed to NOT say family jewels at all. 
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02/29/2012 - Shakespeare Oatmeal Stout (Rogue Ales - Newport, OR)
"I will make it a felony to drink small beer" - William Shakespeare, A Winter’s Tale
This hearty oatmeal stout from Oregon’s Rogue Brewery is the perfect way to end Febrewary. Of course, it helps that it finally snowed, too.
I have thoroughly enjoyed trying and sharing a beer a day and I am planning to post a compilation this weekend. Let’s see how that goes.

02/29/2012 - Shakespeare Oatmeal Stout (Rogue Ales - Newport, OR)

"I will make it a felony to drink small beer" - William Shakespeare, A Winter’s Tale

This hearty oatmeal stout from Oregon’s Rogue Brewery is the perfect way to end Febrewary. Of course, it helps that it finally snowed, too.

I have thoroughly enjoyed trying and sharing a beer a day and I am planning to post a compilation this weekend. Let’s see how that goes.

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nameyourgod:

missjosey:

(via -itsonlyafleshwound)


Whether ‘tis nobler to suffer the slings and gunshots of outraged persons…

nameyourgod:

missjosey:

(via -itsonlyafleshwound)

Whether ‘tis nobler to suffer the slings and gunshots of outraged persons…

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Plays: 30

“Drinking With the Poet” by Scott B Sympathy

(Words/Music: Scott Bradshaw, Album: Drinking With the Poet, Smokeshow Records 1992)

One of my favorite songs during college, it rests on the musical shelf in my mind along with The Lemonheads, fellow Canadians Lowest of the Low and other punk influenced folk-rock. The first strum of the mandolin in the intro usually has me reaching for the radio dial to crank it. With apologies to R.E.M.’s “Losing My Religion”, never, in the history of recorded music, has a mandolin had that effect before. But somehow Scott B Sympathy (aka Scott Bradshaw) pulls it off. He even manages to use the mandolin as a lead instrument in the first part of the solo section before the electric guitar takes over. He has discovered what no one ever knew before: a mandolin can be an effective counter-instrument to the guitar in a rock band.

Lyrically, the song attracted me in college because it combines two things that have been eternally linked: drinking and poetry. As an English Major, we would often joke that certain country’s poets (I’m looking at you, Ireland) had to maintain a minimum blood-alcohol level. In reality, “Drinking With the Poet” is a simple carpe diem song in which the singer does not want to “live with the afterthought” of inaction. Just who the poet is, if relevant, can be up for some debate. The first person I think of is Shakespeare, often referred to as “the bard,” and known for his numerous sonnets, many of which deal with the carpe diem theme. The CD cover, which shows a man and a skeleton drinking, suggests that “the poet” could be death and drinking with him could be a way of prolonging life by distracting death from performing his duty, a theme common in medieval literature. Whoever the poet is, drinking with him seems to be a better alternative than the mundane life the singer is leading in the song. And most importantly to a college English Major: it just sounds cool.

More info on Scott B Sympathy: Wikipedia

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